Energy Sector

Electricity generation

The total installed capacity of the generating plants connected to the Nigerian grid is around 13GW, but since many of the plants are affected by a lack of maintenance and/or investment, the actual available capacity is only around 6.1 GW. The electricity sector is based mainly on gas-fired and large hydro plants. The able below lists all of the operational plants in Nigeria.

 

List of all operational plants in Nigeria

Name Fuel Type Year Completed Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Available Capacity (MW) Actual Generation Capacity (MW) as of May 2015*
AES Gas 2001 270 267 0
AFAM IV-V Gas 1982 580 98 0
AFAM VI Gas 2009 980 559 523
ALAOJI NIPP Gas 2015 335 127 110
DELTA Gas 1990 740 453 300
EGBIN Gas 1985 1,320 931 502
GEREGU Gas 2007 414 282 138
GEREGU NIPP Gas 2012 434 424 90
IBOM POWER Gas 2009 142 115 92
IHOVBOR NIPP Gas 2012 450 327 225
JEBBA Hydro 1986 570 427 255
KAINJI Hydro 1968 760 180 181
OKPAI Gas 2005 480 424 391
OLORUNSOGO Gas 2007 335 244 232
OLORUNSOGO NIPP Gas 2012 675 356 87
OMOKU Gas 2005 150 0 0
OMOTOSHO Gas 2005 335 242 178
OMOTOSHO NIPP Gas 2012 450 318 90
RIVERS IPP Gas 2009 136 166 0
SAPELE Gas 1978 900 145 81
SAPELE NIPP Gas 2012 450 205 116
SHIRORO Hydro 1989 600 480 350
ODUKPANI Gas 2013 561 70 0
Total 12,067 6,840 3,941

Source: National Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy (NREEEP)

Nigeria has one of the lowest net electricity consumption rates in the world (156kWh per capita in 2012), and only half of the population has access to the grid, a factor contributing to the high poverty rate.

The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that in 2011 total primary energy consumption was about 4.3 quadrillion British thermal units (Btus), of which traditional biomass and waste – wood, charcoal, manure and crop residues – accounted for 80%. This high share reflects the use of biomass to meet off-grid heating, lightning and cooking needs, mainly in rural areas.

 

Transmission and distribution network

Since 2012, the energy sector has been going through a reorganisation process under which both generation and distribution are being privatised, although the Federal Government will retain the ownership of transmission assets through Transmission Company of Nigeria (TCN). TCN is currently managed by Canada’s Manitoba Hydro International. At the moment, the Nigerian electricity transmission system consists of about 5,523.8 km of 330 KV lines and 6,801.49 km of 132 KV lines. However, the 330 KV transmission grid in particular suffers high power losses due to its long transmission lines. All in all, the system is technically weak and partially outdated, and coverage is insufficient.