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Tanzania

Tanzania

Political and economic situation

Tanganyika (now mainland Tanzania) became a unitary presidential democratic republic in 1962. Two years later Tanganyika and the island archipelago of Zanzibar merged to form the United Republic of Tanzania. The country’s Government is based on multiparty parliamentary democracy with the incumbent Dr. John Pombe Magufuli elected for a five-year term as the fifth President of the country in 2015. Dr. Ali Mohamed Shein is serving as the 7th President of the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar. Regionally Tanzania is a member of both the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) and the East African Community (EAC).

Tanzania has enjoyed relatively stable, sustained and high GDP growth over the last decade averaging 6.5% per annum. Recent performance has remained strong being 7% in 2015, with estimates predicting similar levels for 2017. Growth has been led by the service, transport, manufacturing, mining, communications and finance sectors. Tanzania intends to become a middle-income nation by 2025, with currently concentration on the second Five Year Development Plan 2016/17-2020/21 (FYDP II). The FYDP II focuses on poverty alleviation through improving education, infrastructure, health services and agriculture as well as effective and efficient governance through increasing government revenue and combating corruption. Energy production and distribution are highlighted in the country’s plan as being central to the promotion of socio-economic development. Efforts being centered on increasing diversification in the electricity mix from hydropower to natural gas and reforms of the power utility Tanzania Electric Supply Company Limited (TANESCO).

The strong economic performance has resulted in socio-economic developments in the country. Despite these great strides challenges remain for the Government to ensure that the economic growth results in poverty reduction across society. The World Bank reported a decline in the poverty rate from 34% in 2007 to 28% in 2012, though the absolute number of Tanzanians living below the national poverty line remains unchanged across the same period due to population growth. Building from this point the country faces two related and significant challenges that will need to be addressed in the coming years. Firstly the 800,000 youth entering into labor force every year, in addition to rapid urbanisation faced by major centres. Particularly the population of the country’s commercial capital of Dar es Salaam face high unemployment rates in conjunction with pressured public service infrastructure for transport, electricity, water and sewerage. The private sector has been identified as having the potential to play a key role in overcoming these development challenges.

 

Key figures

Available statistics:
Capital
Dodoma
Official languages
Kiswahili, English
Population (2016 projection)
50,142,938
Population growth (2016 est.), %
2.77
Median age (2016 est.), years
17.6
Urbanization rate (2010 - 2015), % p.a.
5.36
Urban population (2015), % of total
32
Rural population (2015), % of total
68
Population density (2015), per km2
60
HDI (2014)
151 of 188
National Currency
Tanzanian Shilling (TZS)
Exchange rate (March 2017), USD
1 USD = 2,237 TZS
GDP (2015), USD billion current
45.63
GDP growth (2015), %
7.0
GDP annual growth rate forecast (2020), %
6.64
GNI per capita (2015), current int’l USD
2,630
Inflation (2016), %
5.0
Inflation Rate Forecast (2020), %
6.0
Foreign Direct Investment, net inflows (2015), BOP current USD billion
1.961
Net official development assistance (2014), current USD billon
2.648
Budget deficit (2016 est,), % of GDP
-3.90
Ease of Doing Business (2017), rank of 190
135
TI Corruption Index (2016), rank of 168
117
Installed Generation Capacity (MW, 2016)
1,357.69
Installed Fossil Fuel Capacity (2016), % of total installed capacity
57.5
Hydro Capacity (2016), % of total installed capacity
41.7
Other RE Capacity (2016), % of total installed capacity
0.77
Renewable electricity output as % of total electricity output excl. hydro (2016)
0.6
Avg. distribution and transmission losses as % of output (2016)
16.4
Net electricity imports (2016), GWh
85.77
Electrification rate, total (2014) %
30
Electrification rate, urban (2014) %
57
Electrification rate, rural (2014) %
18
Peak demand (2016), MW
1026
Per capita electricity consumption (2016), kWh
137
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